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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 172 (some duplicates have been removed)
media and technology i didn't know there was a career path for it. everybody kept on telling me you should be a doctor, a lawyer because that's where the money is. the usual thing that parents say. it seemed to me you really have to be very lucky and hard working like a steven speilburg or end up video taping weddings which i have done and there is nothing wrong with. so in community college i finally decided to take a video production course which lead me to pursue a degree in broadcasting and i just dove in. my first semester at san francisco state i realized i would need some real world experience, and so i applied and was accepted into the internship at bay cat and i never left so i am still there. i learned so much there, not just the technical skills, but also soft skills needed to get hired in any work place. i love the work so much so i chose to stay on and i'm going to be a volunteer just to be able to learn the advance production skills and help the next generation of interns, so after graduating from college at sf state they offered me a job. they were employed me an
in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we a
and placing them in the newest areas in our technology industry and when ron conway. ron just arrived and got out of at&t together. we worked together and had a personal agreement if we were as a city were to help technology we were going to have technology help us, so less than two years later when i first started the unemployment rate in san francisco was 9.6% and last friday we flipd that number in less than two years. [applause] lead my all the industries but most importantly by our technology industry. over 14,000, to 15,000 jobs were technology sector alone so it's right for us to make sure our future, our kids, our returning veterans, our people in their mid-career of their jobs now have an opportunity to really join in this job creating effort, and i still will say it's the private sector working with city government that's going to create the newest jobs for generations to come. today as part of the ongoing month of orange, month of innovation it's not only a celebration we all declared it innovation month and we wanted to make this announcement today about the steps we're taking
of range from writers and virtual wineries which are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happ
are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each oth
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city an
there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong research center and because of
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk
or disabled have unfortunately historically been at the margins of new technologies when they are introduced. today, as broadband internet brings expanded opportunities in health care, education, and civic participation, projects like this one here in san francisco are critical to making sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical specialists who are hundreds of miles away, for students to take online classes and universities across the country, and for governments to deliver services more efficiently and more easily to their constituents. for seniors, especially those whose families may live in different states or in different countries, broadband allows families to bond together in a way that telephone just never did. my own parents and all live in mexico city, and we are lucky because we both of broadband connections in our home. if a few weeks ago we got on skype. we set up the computer in our kitchen, and they set it up in their dining room but they in
that as new technology comes along that people don't have to choose between using the new technology and keeping their privacy. we are pleased to hear that mtc is taking action that clipper action, although not as precise as information from a cell phone, can reveal a lot about a individual. it can reveal if you got on or off bart near a hospital, near a clinic, all sorts of things that may imply things about your personal life and particularly over a long period of time there is an extensive amount of information collected about a person. are they going to church on a regular basis. are they going to baseball games when they are supposed to be at work? i think it is important to recognize that these records should be respected, should be treated as private information and as the commission said, should be looked at and retained only as long as necessary for operational purposes, not because it's cheap to retain data but because you need them for fraud. i'd like to demonstrate to the committee, this is an application for an android app >> what is it called again? fare bot it req
, one of which is directing the department of technology to host quarterly radio communication stakeholder meetings with the department of emergency management, sfmta, the public utilities commission, police, fire, and the motorola bay with staff to ensure there is clear and consistent communication about the status of the current and future planned radio communication projects, and directing the sfmta to provide regular reports back to coit and their subcommittees on the project -- on the progress of this project. in addition, in terms of the regular projects for the city, coit has directed the department of technology to do a study as there is not a plan for the current facilities, the condition of those facilities, and recommendations on how to proceed for other city departments' requirements, technical specifications, timing and a budget for the rest of the city to move forward for their -- to upgrade their radio and data communications. i would also note that the regional motorola bay width system regarding that project in february of 2012, the u.s. congress enacted the mi
,000 gallons a day. it is the beginning of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we
that certainly san francisco sits in the seat of such technological developments that are really evolving and reshaping the world on so many fronts, biotech, biomedical, engineering feats. will could not understand why we could not board and eight with the technology available, state-of-the-art information system. for our citizens. thank you very much. i am very excited. it seems as though we are exponentially improving. i don't expect that we will wait another 10 years for similar reports. i am expecting that certainly within the next year we will be 10 steps further ahead. a few years ago it would've taken longer. i am very excited about this and excited that we can share this discussion with the police department commission. as far as the development of justice. thank you very much to all of that been involved. very critical. >> commissioner kingsley? >> ms. young, thank you very much for your report. it is very interesting. some of the questions i had have been addressed by commissioner schwatz's comments. i wanted more clarity around the timing and history of this. is 2012
as to whether or not we were following the technology. >> you mean speaking into something and have it automatic to dictate into english? >> well yes but on a more professional level, a particular software application developed. (off mic) >> the best thing is to have an interpreter. >> commissioner kingsley: a real person, absolutely. thank you very much. >> commissioner chan? >> commissioner chan: in terms of the reference to psas, says we are televised, we can educate the public on how to make it was reported you are involved in domestic violence. can you describe what the issues were, and how we can collaboratively address the issue? here is how it works. when there's a problem you go to the department or the commission and we address it. >> one thing that sandra had spoken about in our workshop is that there was an issue where psa may not have known severity of the walk-in who had some type of an issue. prior to me get in there. if you have an issue, and you don't speak, don't leave. the last thing we want to do is have the person leave. if this is impractical emerge
and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 million per week just on our
but we have done it. once lead certified the civic center retrofit strategies and technology can serve as a model to other cities and i would like to take this opportunity to recognize leaders from all the country and our world that have made great strides in environmental stewardships themselves and have joined in this conference including mayor fong from oakland, mayor kevin johnson from sacramento, mayor cory booker from new ark and hif a applause and support his city with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> well, thank you, everybody. and welcome. happy thanksgiving and happy season of sharing and caring for each other. i just spent a wonderful morning with the inter-faith c
.s. department of education. his district includes silicon valley, the birthplace of technology. mike has dedicated his life to public service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and
angels and a possible new warrior stadium and technology and creatively innovate the transportation system but it's the investment and success of the neighborhoods in san francisco because that's what counts. when a neighborhood is strong a city is strong and that is a message that can't be missed and we can't lose sight of that and thank you hud for the grant and believing in our city's comprehensive approach to improve public housing and it's nice that we received two. that'sow awesome we are and i want to say thank you very much. >> well ladies and gentlemen i'm going to wrap up. i'm going to take about two minutes. i just need to thank a bunch of folks and of course mayor lee thank you for had opportunity. i know last time i did this dancing and that's not going to happen today but i am shouting and carrying on but we're not dancing. we have dr. hernandez and chairman and the commissioners and i think allen is here and the public tenant housing and gina and lots of associates and i want alex to step out for a second. we couldn't do this without speaker -- i mean leader pel
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brings the vast forests of new products and new technologies and new patents in the future. that is where we have to -- we have to keep our eye on the main thought here. that is the discipline, the imagination, and the investment. that is what makes california -- that is why people are still coming here. they're not staying in colorado, i am sorry to say. they're right here. [applause] >> just briefly, setting aside plunder for a moment. >> i am sorry about plunder. it is a big part of wealth creation. >> could you talk briefly about your turn initiative? >> it is going well. mike rossi is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north
for a long time, but something all our companies have in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals ju
technology is an answer here. i am a big fan. >> [inaudible] i would love to hear from each one of you with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and existing programs. >> i forgot to repeat the q
. >>> scientist meeting in san francisco today unvailed a new technology that could help better predict storms. it keeps track of the pineapple express winter storms. those rivers are monitored by ground moisture sensors and gps. the new technology was presented at the american gee you physical convention today. >>> the results are in from the first test of marsian soil. right now scientists say they have no evidence to support life. it also came from the meeting of the geo physical union. >>> a fire district is reconsidering some of its protocols tonight after three firefighters were injured after responding to a traffic accident. they say precautions that were not taken yesterday might have prevented it. >> the fire engine is out of service for now. the accident happened during yesterday morning's rainstorm. firefighters responded to a minor car accident near the wilder road exit. the cars were on the shoulder and officials say the firefighters followed procedure for parking engines on freeways. >> we have a procedure that requires them to park at an angle to protect the scene >> fire offici
, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses and you see the woman you fell in love with. she's everything to you. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for che
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 172 (some duplicates have been removed)